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20120930
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
remember back in 2004, george w. bush got obliterated by john kerry in the first debate. it was one of the worst performances in a debate i've ever seen. remember he asked for the extra time? then he'd just look in the camera and go, it's hard. it's hard. and yet he still won. this is not -- this keeps the game going, right? >> it do. i think -- i kept thinking about mark twain. the rumors of romney's political death were greatly exaggerated, but twain still died. >> well, there is that. god. thank you this morning for that insight. >> can we go to breaking news or a developing banner on that one? mark twain, dead. >> still dead. >> still dead. >> but i thought it was as -- i think '04 -- >> you know, he's funnier in central time zone. i'm sorry, go ahead. >> on something. >> you should see the stat yuue they have of willie geist down here. >> it's huge. >> i'm going to cite my -- the person who knows most about politics in my life, my 8-year-old daughter who came in and asked, why is president obama so mad? >> there you go. >> walked by the screen. >> i think that's a really, you k
forward to 1982. george h.w. bush was on the ropes over bill clinton when casper weinberger was imply indicated in the iran/contra scandal shortly before election day. bad news for bush that he did not need. in 2004 a classic october surprise. osama bin laden released a video on october 29th just four days before election day in a raz orthin race between president bush and john kerry. three years after 9/11 it served as a reminder of the terrorist threat and strategists in both parties believed helped president bush. more recently the term october surprise has come to mean a seismic event in the fall of an election year though most have centered around foreign policy others have been about the economy like in 2008. when the economy imploded, john mccain's advisers say his campaign collapsed along with it and never recovered. historians say in order for an october surprise to have a real 11th hour impact it has to feed into a narrative that already exist, whether it's carter's ineffectiveness or questions about mccain's credentials on the economy. >> it's not so much that suddenly eure
obama won the state. in 2004, george w. bush beat senator john kerry with 52% of the vote, and we all remember what happened in 2000 between vice president gore and george w. bush. how difficult is it to handicap the race in florida? >> well, i'd say it's pretty close to impossible. your poll -- your poll this week basically showed what ours showed about a week and a half ago, that it was a one-point race. and as anne mentioned, there are these economic head winds. florida is at 8.8%. people feel that. this isn't a state where we've had a thriving auto sector. we have really no manufacturing here. so you can't talk about the auto bailout. you know, we have a home building industry, and that's essentially been in the tank. the state's home foreclosure race is among the highest in the nation. probably the third highest, if i'm not mistaken. so you have this as the backdrop. and there's a really broad sense among people that the country's headed in the wrong direction, that the state's headed in the wrong direction, and it's difficult for obama to sell that sense of optimism he had befor
that in 1984, reagan's first debate was a disaster. george w. bush's debate was a disaster. i don't think it will be a disaster. but you saw on the univision interview. when you are abe incumbent president you are not used to being challenged. bill: what do you think the impact of a potential exchange like we just watched will have on this 15% rasmussen is talking about? >> rich is right. it depends on what it is. there was another debate moment in 2008 that seemed to change the trajectory a little bit. remember when hillary was told people don't like her and she said that hurts my feelings and it was kind of like funny, self-deprecating moment, and it seemed to move women voters in a way. you can't ever really know. there could just be some sort of moment that moves people in a certain direction, though. i think the bigger issue is mitt romney making people feel like i'm a goodall tern tough to obama. you are not that happy with him or you wouldn't be undecide or persuadable. but i'm safe. i'm somebody you can trust with the future. bill: the audience is enormous. 50 million americans wi
. that was the moment in 1992 then president george h.w. bush looked at his watch during the debate with bill clinton and ross perot. want to talk to dean, a stand-up comedian, writer, and, of course, contributor. dean, you know performing. you have studied these two guys. you write in your blog the candidates who are funny in the debates tend to get elected. what do you think? either one of these guys going to get a laugh? >> i think they're going to try. i'll be honest with you. let's be honest, you don't need a political consultant to tell you, if you make people laugh, you're creating a bomb with them. you're getting an organic disorderly action. they're laughing and they're feeling more warm to you, and i think it's a thing that's overlooked by mft candidates. i think look at ronald reagan's joke. classic. he used it. he destroyed an issue and made himself more likable at the same time. >> do they need to go in with a strategy to be funny, because sometimes when you plan these things and you bomb, it looks even worse. >> i can tell you, i have told many jokes that have bombed in my career. i can
george w. bush went up against al gore. in gore's case, a strategist thought he lost that debate in the spin room. so i wonder, matt, how much of this is decided by what the candidates actually say? and how much by the pundits the day after? >> i give the american people some credit. i think they can listen and watch. and most evidence has shown that people start paying attention maybe around the conventions. they pay a lot of attention in the debates as well. what romney has to do is to get people who don't think obama has earned a second mandate, he's got to get them to think he deserved to replace him. there is room to make that case. i don't think he's made that case so far, but we're talking about tinkering around the margins. i think both sides are going to -- democrats are going to vote democrat, republicans will vote republican. >> and john mccain who knows more than a little bit about what it's like to be in a presidential debate had this take on "morning joe" today. >> i think for us to raise the expectation, he's got to do something spectacular. those things don't happ
. good choice. go national. go like a pro. >>> president george w. bush appointed john roberts to the high court when chief justice william rehnquist died. the senate confirmed roberts 78-22. justice john paul stevens administered the oath in the east room of the white house. tomorrow is the start of the new term of the supreme court and it's shaping up to be an important one for civil rights. toor more we turn to nbc news justice correspondent, pete williams. >> this supreme court term may be one of the most important in decades for civil rights. with the potential for blockbuster decisions on race and same-sex marriage. the court will examine the widespread practice of considering the race of students who apply for college. the case brought by a white high school senior, abigail fisher who said affirmative action kept her out of the university of texas. >> i always thought from the time i was a little girl that any kind of discrimination was wrong and for an institution of higher learning to act this way makes no sense to me. >> the university says it considers race as one fa
go back to when george w. bush was president of the united states and when gas was, what, 3 bucks a gallon, something like that? it was gigantic letters on the headline, the paper of the "new york times" where they were hammering it. now we've got a president where the gas has doubled. i think it was 1.85 when he took office. now close to 4 bucks. >> i think that we have seen, steve, an amazing propensity of the media to kind of put a very positive spin on some pretty not so impresssive economic news. >> steve: what is that? >> because maybe i think a number of us have been stunned by the extent to which this time at least headline writers seem to lean towards democrats. if you have headline about slow growth, you would expect to see that in the headline. but instead, you see a headline in the times or the journal about a stock surge instead. they did a study at -- aei did a study that showed 15% of the headline which is tended to be more positive given grim economic news and when you're talking about democrats. >> steve: the word is not getting out. >> they're cheerleading they'r
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)